Where is God when we need him?

In preparing for our Rotation on Joseph’s Coat, I had an “ah-ha” moment. (It is times like this when I like to describe our Cool Disciples program as “adult education disguised as a children’s program.”) I was reading Genesis 37 and I was struck by the realization that in the entire chapter, God is never mentioned! That made me wonder:

Where is God in the story of Joseph and his coat?

That’s when I realized that this was the perfect chance to present this concept:

Recognize that in our lives God’s activity may be hidden.

Sometimes we wonder: where is God? And we want our kids to know that it is perfectly ok to have times in their lives when they may wail: Where are you God?!?

A painting of Joseph being sold by his brothers

Surely Joseph had these thoughts as he watching his brothers trade him for pieces of silver. (Let alone during the long trip to Egypt!)

Surely Jacob wondered, where is God, when his sons presented him with Joseph’s bloody coat.

Surely you’ve wondered: Where is God?  (I can think of dry times when I have!)

How about some discussion at the family dinner table? (Or wherever your family is gathered together.)

  • Share times when God has seemed far away in your life.
  • Allow others to share.
  • What brought you back to the reality of God as always being there with you?
  • What are ways that would help you remember that God is always with you?

God’s activity may be hidden to us. It may seem like God is ignoring us!

Rest assured that God is with you in all situations.

Sometimes God’s work takes place mysteriously out of sight. Joseph didn’t give up hope. It took time, but eventually Joseph was able to discover that God used each step of his life, the good and the bad, to complete a plan for Joseph’s life. Take a look at Genesis 50:20, as Joseph later (many years later!) said to his brothers:

You tried to harm me, but God made it turn out for the best.

We may not always see it, but God is always there!


Photo credits:
Click here for info on banner photo (not visible in readers or email).
Joseph is sold by Károly Ferenczy, a painting in the Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.